23 April 2014
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Mathematica in Non-Linear Elasticity Theory

Author(s): A.N. Papusha

Abstract:
A derivation of the equations of deformations and the static equations of stresses of the non-linear theory of elasticity of an elastic body is described.

This paper includes a derivation of the non-linear balance equations using Mathematica, thus differing from well known and widely used methods described earlier in works [1,2,3]. 1 Introduction The theory of elasticity as a scientific discipline arose at the beginning of the 19th century, when almost simultaneously C.

Navier (1822) [1], A.

(1825) [2], and S.

Poisson (1829) [3] deduced general equations of static balance and motion of elastic bodies and gave correct statements of related problems.

The main aim of the theory of elasticity is a study of the determination of deformations and internal forces arising in e...

Pages: 8
Size: 637 kb
Paper DOI: 10.2495/IMS970501

 

 

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